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Dictionary of the History of Ideas

Studies of Selected Pivotal Ideas
170 occurrences of ideology
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170 occurrences of ideology
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BIBLIOGRAPHY

The literature on the Platonic theory of ideas is very
extensive. Almost anything that has been said about it has
been, and will be, contested. For the most complete list
of articles and books on the subject, see Harold Cherniss,
Lustrum, 1959, No. 4 and 1960, No. 5 (Goettingen, 1960,
1961), pp. 278ff. The most authoritative account of the
entire Platonic philosophy is Paul Shorey, What Plato Said
(Chicago, 1933). For Aristotle's writings as a whole the best
translation is that usually referred to as the Oxford Transla-
tion, by a variety of scholars, in twelve volumes (1910-52).
A single work on Aristotle that is frequently cited is W. D.
Ross, Aristotle, 5th ed. (London and New York, 1955).
But, as is true of Platonism, anything said about Aristoteli-
anism will be contested. There is no satisfactory translation
into English at present of Plotinus but one is promised for
the Loeb Classical Library. For the modern philosophers,
see J. H. Randall, Jr., The Career of Philosophy, to be three


549

volumes (New York, 1962, 1965, 19—); G. Boas, Dominant
Themes of Modern Philosophy
(New York, 1957); and the
various volumes of Frederick Copleston, S.J., A History of
Philosophy
(Westminster, Md., 1946-63). Each of these
histories is written from a special point of view which must
be kept in mind when they are consulted. For the influence
of Platonism and Neo-Platonism on art and aesthetics, see
Katharine Gilbert and Helmut Kuhn, A History of Esthetics,
rev. ed. (Bloomington, Ind., 1953). For number symbolism
in the Gothic cathedral, see Otto von Simson, The Gothic
Cathedral,
2nd ed. (New York, 1956).

GEORGE BOAS

[See also Causation; Freedom; Naturalism; Neo-Platonism;
Number; Pragmatism; Primitivism; Pythagorean....]