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Dictionary of the History of Ideas

Studies of Selected Pivotal Ideas
170 occurrences of ideology
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170 occurrences of ideology
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BIBLIOGRAPHY

The principal sources and bibliography are given in M.
Clagett, The Science of Mechanics in the Middle Ages (Madi-
son, 1959); also E. A. Moody and M. Clagett, eds., The
Medieval Science of Weights
(Madison, 1952). See too A. C.
Crombie, Robert Grosseteste and the Origins of Experi-
mental Science, 1100-1700
(Oxford, 1953), p. 195; idem,
Medieval and Early Modern Science, 2nd rev. ed., 2 vols.
(Cambridge, Mass., 1961); E. J. Dijksterhuis, The Mecha-
nization of the World Picture,
trans. C. Dikshoorn (Oxford,
1961); J. A. Weisheipl, The Development of Physical Theory
in the Middle Ages
(New York, 1959); P. Duhem, Études
sur Léonard de Vinci,
3 vols. (Paris, 1906-13; reprint 1955),
a pioneer work of great scope, but requires revision in light
of the researches of A. Maier in her Studien zur Naturphi-
losophie der Spätscholastik,
5 vols. (Rome, 1949-58), espe-
cially Vol. I, DieVorläufer Galileis im 14 Jahrhundert (Rome,
1949) and Vol. V, Zwischen Philosophie und Mechanik
(Rome, 1958). See also: P. Duhem le Système du monde,
10 vols. (Paris, 1913-59); idem, To Save the Phenomena, trans
E. Doland and C. Maschler (Chicago, 1969; original in
French, 1908).

Special studies include C. B. Boyer, The Rainbow: From
Myth to Mathematics
(New York, 1959); Jean Buridan,
Quaestiones super libros quattuor de caelo et mundo, ed.
E. A. Moody (Cambridge, Mass., 1942); M. Clagett, Archi-
medes in the Middle ages, Vol. I. The Arabo-Latin Tradition

(Madison, 1964); idem, Nicole Oresme and the Medieval
Geometry of Qualities and Motions
(Madison, 1968); H. L.
Crosby, Jr., ed. and trans., Thomas of Bradwardine, His
Tractatus de Proportionibus,Its Significance for the De-
velopment of Mathematical Physics
(Madison, 1955); S.
Drake and I. E. Drabkin, eds. and trans., Mechanics in
Sixteenth Century Italy
(Madison, 1969); H. Élie, “Quelques
Maîtres de l'université de Paris vers l'an 1500,” Archives
d'histoire doctrinale et littéraire du moyen âge,
18 (1950-51),
193-243; N. W. Gilbert, Renaissance Concepts of Method
(New York, 1960); E. Grant, ed. and trans., Nicole Oresme,
De proportionibus proportionum and ad pauca respicientes
(Madison, 1966); M. A. Hoskin and A. G. Molland, “Swines-
head on Falling Bodies: An Example of Fourteenth-Century
Physics,” The British Journal for the History of Science, 3
(1966), 150-82; A. Koyré, From the Closed World to the
Infinite Universe
(Baltimore, 1957), and idem, Études
galiléennes,
3 vols. (Paris, 1939), much of which is sum-
marized in idem, Metaphysics and Measurement: Essays in
the Scientific Revolution
(Cambridge, Mass., 1968); E.
McMullin, ed., Galileo: Man of Science (New York, 1967);
M. McVaugh, “Arnald of Villanova and Bradwardine's
Law,”
Isis, 58 (1967), 56-64; A. D. Menut and A. J. Denomy,
eds., Eng. trans. by Menut, Nicole Oresme, Le Livre du ciel
et du monde
(Madison, 1968); E. A. Moody, “Galileo and
His Precursors,” Galileo Reappraised, ed. C. L. Golino
(Berkeley, 1966), pp. 23-43; idem, “Galileo and Avempace:
The Dynamics of the Leaning Tower Experiment,” Journal
of the History of Ideas,
12 (1951), 163-93, 375-422. J. E.
Murdoch, Rationes Mathematice: Un Aspect du rapport
des mathématiques et de la philosophie au moyen âge
(Paris,
1962); J. H. Randall, Jr., The School of Padua and the
Emergence of Modern Science
(Padua, 1961); C. B. Schmitt,
“Experimental Evidence for and against a Void: The Six-
teenth-Century Arguments,” Isis, 58 (1967), 352-66; W. A.
Wallace, The Scientific Methodology of Theodoric of Freiberg
(Fribourg, 1959); idem, “The Enigma of Domingo de Soto:
Uniformiter Difformis and Falling Bodies in Late Medieval
Physics,” Isis, 59 (1968), 384-401; idem, “The 'Calculatores'
in Early Sixteenth-Century Physics,” The British Journal for
the History of Science,
4 (1969), 231-32; idem, “Mechanics
from Bradwardine to Galileo,” Journal of the History of
Ideas,
32 (1971), 15-28; J. A. Weisheipl, “The Concept of
Matter in Fourteenth Century Science,” in The Concept of
Matter,
ed. E. McMullin (Notre Dame, 1963), pp. 319-41;
C. Wilson, William Heytesbury: Medieval Logic and the
Rise of Mathematical Physics
(Madison, 1960).

WILLIAM A. WALLACE

[See also Abstraction; Alchemy; Astrology; Authority; Cau-
sation; Continuity; Islamic Conception; Neo-Platonism;
Optics; Renaissance Humanism.]

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