University of Virginia Library

Search this document 
Dictionary of the History of Ideas

Studies of Selected Pivotal Ideas
7 occurrences of Dictionary_of_the_History_of_Ideas
[Clear Hits]
  
  
collapse section 
  
  
  
  
collapse section 
collapse section 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionII. 
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
  
  
  
collapse section 
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse section 
  
  
  
  
collapse section 
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionII. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionIV. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVII. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
collapse sectionI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionIV. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionIV. 
  
collapse sectionIV. 
  
  
  
collapse sectionIV. 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse section 
  
  
  
  
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
collapse sectionV. 
  
collapse sectionIII. 
  
collapse sectionVI. 
  
  
  
  
  
  

7 occurrences of Dictionary_of_the_History_of_Ideas
[Clear Hits]

J. B. Watson was by no means the first to see the
importance for psychology of the objective study of
behavior. William McDougall, in his Physiological
Psychology
in 1905, had defined psychology as “the
positive science of the conduct of living creatures” and
had resisted the tendency to describe it as the science
of experience or of consciousness. In 1908, in his Intro-
duction to Social Psychology,
he explicitly introduced
the term “behavior” claiming that psychology was “the
positive science of conduct or behavior.” He main-
tained that psychology must not regard introspective
description of the stream of consciousness as its whole
task. This had to be supplemented by comparative and
physiological psychology relying largely on objective
methods, the observation of man and animals under
all possible conditions of health and disease. Similarly
in 1911 W. B. Pillsbury, a pupil of Titchener, published
his Essentials of Psychology in which he claimed that
psychology should be defined as “the science of human
behavior.” But neither McDougall nor Pillsbury put
forward a puritanical or restrictive position. They were
merely arguing that the objective study of animals and
of physiology had a lot to contribute to psychology.
It was therefore unwarranted to give a definition of
psychology which excluded their findings from the
outset.

What was distinctive about Watson's view of psy-
chology was what it excluded rather than what it
included; for McDougall himself was a devotee both
of physiology and of animal studies. Watson was deter-
mined to rule out introspection as a legitimate method
of obtaining data and to banish “consciousness” and
other mentalistic terms from the conceptual scheme
of his new science. What led him to this methodolog-
ical puritanism?